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quadproc arcon.quad


NAME · USAGE_ · PARAMETERS · DESCRIPTION · 1._PARAMETERS · 2._FIXPIX
3._OVERSCAN · 4._TRIM · 5._ZEROCOR · 6._DARKCOR · 7._FLATCOR
8._ILLUMCOR · 9._FRINGECOR · 10._READCOR · 11._SCANCOR · 12._OUTLINE_OF_PROCESSING_STEPS
13._PROCESSING_ARITHMETIC · 14._IN_THE_ABSENCE_OF_IMAGE_HEADER_INFORMATION
EXAMPLES · SEE_ALSO

NAME

quadproc -- Process multi-readout CCD images

USAGE

quadproc images

PARAMETERS

images
List of input CCD images to process. The list may include processed images and calibration images.
ccdtype = ""
CCD image type to select from the input image list. If no type is given then all input images will be selected. The recognized types are described in ccdtypes .
max_cache = 0
Maximum image caching memory (in Mbytes). If there is sufficient memory the calibration images, such as zero level, dark count, and flat fields, will be cached in memory when processing many input images. This reduces the disk I/O and makes the task run a little faster. If the value is zero image caching is not used.
noproc = no
List processing steps only?

PROCESSING SWITCHES

fixpix = yes
Fix bad CCD lines and columns by linear interpolation from neighboring lines and columns? If yes then a bad pixel file must be specified.
overscan = yes
Apply overscan or prescan bias correction? If yes then the overscan image section and the readout axis must be specified.
trim = yes
Trim the image of the overscan region and bad edge lines and columns? If yes then the trim section must be specified.
zerocor = yes
Apply zero level correction? If yes a zero level image must be specified.
darkcor = yes
Apply dark count correction? If yes a dark count image must be specified.
flatcor = yes
Apply flat field correction? If yes flat field images must be specified.
illumcor = no
Apply illumination correction? If yes illumination images must be specified.
fringecor = no
Apply fringe correction? If yes fringe images must be specified.
readcor = no
Convert zero level images to readout correction images? If yes then zero level images are averaged across the readout axis to form one dimensional zero level readout correction images.
scancor = no
Convert flat field images to scan mode flat field images? If yes then the form of scan mode correction is specified by the parameter scantype .

PROCESSING PARAMETERS

readaxis = "line"
Read out axis specified as "line" or "column".
fixfile
File describing the bad lines and columns. If "image" is specified then the file is specified in the image header or instrument translation file. See Section 2. of Description for further information on bad pixel files.
biassec
Overscan bias strip image section. If "image" is specified then the overscan bias section is specified in the image header or instrument translation file. See Section 3. of Description for further information on setting this parmeter.
trimsec
image section for trimming. If "image" is specified then the trim image section is specified in the image header or instrument translation file. See Section 4. of Description for further information on setting this parmeter.
zero = ""
Zero level calibration image. The zero level image may be one or two dimensional. The CCD image type and subset are not checked for these images and they take precedence over any zero level calibration images given in the input list.
dark = ""
Dark count calibration image. The CCD image type and subset are not checked for these images and they take precedence over any dark count calibration images given in the input list.
flat = ""
Flat field calibration images. The flat field images may be one or two dimensional. The CCD image type is not checked for these images and they take precedence over any flat field calibration images given in the input list. The flat field image with the same subset as the input image being processed is selected.
illum = ""
Illumination correction images. The CCD image type is not checked for these images and they take precedence over any illumination correction images given in the input list. The illumination image with the same subset as the input image being processed is selected.
fringe = ""
Fringe correction images. The CCD image type is not checked for these images and they take precedence over any fringe correction images given in the input list. The fringe image with the same subset as the input image being processed is selected.
minreplace = 1.
When processing flat fields, pixel values below this value (after all other processing such as overscan, zero, and dark corrections) are replaced by this value. This allows flat fields processed by quadproc to be certain to avoid divide by zero problems when applied to object images.
scantype = "shortscan"
Type of scan format used in creating the CCD images. The modes are:
"shortscan"
The CCD is scanned over a number of lines and then read out as a regular two dimensional image. In this mode unscanned flat fields are numerically scanned to form scanned flat fields comparable to the observations. If the flat field calibration images are taken in scanned mode then scancor should be no and the processing performed in the same manner as in unscanned mode.
"longscan"
In this mode the CCD is clocked and read out continuously to form a long strip. Flat fields are averaged across the readout axis to form a one dimensional flat field readout correction image. This assumes that all recorded image lines are clocked over the entire active area of the CCD.
nscan
Number of scan readout lines used in short scan mode. This parameter is used when the scan type is "shortscan".

OVERSCAN FITTING PARAMETERS

interactive = no
Fit the overscan vector interactively? If yes the overscan vector is fit interactively using the icfit package. If no then the fitting parameters given below are used.
function = "legendre"
Overscan fitting function. The function types are "legendre" polynomial, "chebyshev" polynomial, "spline1" linear spline, and "spline3" cubic spline.
order = 1
Number of polynomial terms or spline pieces in the overscan fit.
sample = "*"
Sample points to use in the overscan fit. The string "*" specified all points otherwise an icfit range string is used.
naverage = 1
Number of points to average or median to form fitting points. Positive numbers specify averages and negative numbers specify medians.
niterate = 1
Number of rejection interations to remove deviant points from the overscan fit. If 0 then no points are rejected.
low_reject = 3., high_reject = 3.
Low and high sigma rejection factors for rejecting deviant points from the overscan fit.
grow = 0.
One dimensional growing radius for rejection of neighbors to deviant points.

DESCRIPTION

Quadproc processes CCD images to remove all "instrumental signatures" from the data. The opperations performed are:

o correct detector defects (bad lines and columns)
o determine readout bias level using overscan and subtract it
o trim off the overscan regions and unwanted border pixels
o subtract zero level bias
o subtract dark counts
o correct for pixel-to-pixel sensitivity variations
o correct for non-uniform illumination
o correct for fringing

Quadproc is a cl script based on the task ccdproc in the ccdred package. It is specificaly designed to deal with Arcon data obtained in multi-readout mode (see quadformat ). A feature of such images is that each readout typically has a slightly different, DC bias level, gain, and readout noise. As a result both zero frames and uniformly illuminated exposures show a characteristic chequer board pattern, the sections of the image read through each amplifier having different levels. In addition, there will be a separate overscan strip, used to monitor the zero level, for each readout. The location of these overscan strips in the raw frame depends on which amplifiers are used. Quadproc splits each multi-readout image into subimages, one for each amplifier, and also calculates the biassec and trimsec appropriately for each. It then calls ccdproc to perform the first three opperations listed above. The sub-images are then glued back together. Finaly, ccdproc is called a second time to perform all the remaining reduction steps.

Quadproc MUST be used for the reduction of multi-readout data up to and including the trimming step, and it is convenient to use it for the entire reduction process. However, once ALL images have been trimmed it is possible to finish the reductions using ccdproc if the quad package is not available at your home institution. Quadproc recognizes mono-readout images and processes them directly using ccdproc . If your images are a mixture of multi- and mono- readout use quadproc ; if you only have mono-readout data use ccdproc .

Quadproc is identical to ccdproc in the way it is used, and has exactly the same parameters; as far as possible it also behaves in the same way. To run it, all one has to do is set the parameters and then begin processing the images. The task takes care of most of the record keeping and automatically does the prerequisite processing of calibration images. For ease of reference, the following sections provide a simple outline of how to use the task, together with a description of the opperations performed. They are taken almost verbatim from the help page for ccdproc . If you are already familiar with that task you should read sections 2., 3. and 4. below, which include information on the preparation of the badpixel file, and on how to specify biassec and trimsec parameters. See section 12. for a description of the differences between the two tasks. For a user's guide and cookbook for the quad package see guide .

1. Parameters

There are many parameters but they may be easily reviewed and modified using the task eparam . The input CCD images to be processed are given as an image list. Previously processed images are ignored and calibration images are recognized, provided the CCD image types are in the image header (see instruments and ccdtypes ). Quadproc separates multi- and mono-readout images in the input list and handles them accordingly. Therefore it is permissible to use simple image templates such as "*.imh". The ccdtype parameter may be used to select only certain types of CCD images to process (see ccdtypes ).

The processing operations are selected by boolean (yes/no) parameters. Because calibration images are recognized and processed appropriately, the processing operations for object images should be set. Any combination of operations may be specified. Two of the operations, readcor and scancor , are only applicable to zero level and flat field images respectively. These are used for certain types of CCDs and modes of operation.

The processing steps selected have related parameters which must be set. These are things like image sections defining the overscan and trim regions and calibration images. There are a number of parameters used for fitting the overscan or prescan bias section. These are parameters used by the standard IRAF curve fitting package icfit . The parameters are described in more detail in the following sections.

In addition to the task parameters there are package parameters which affect quadproc . These include the instrument and subset files, the text and plot log files, the output pixel datatype, the verbose parameter for logging to the terminal, and the backup prefix. These are described in quad .

Calibration images are specified by task parameters and/or in the input image list. If more than one calibration image is specified then the first one encountered is used. Calibration images specified by task parameters take precedence over calibration images in the input list. These images also need not have a CCD image type parameter since the task parameter identifies the type of calibration image. This method is best if there is only one calibration image for all images to be processed, almost always true for zero level and dark count images. If no calibration image is specified by task parameter then calibration images in the input image list are identified and used. This requires that the images have CCD image types recognized by the package. This method is useful if one may simply say "*.imh" as the image list to process all images or if the images are broken up into groups, in "@" files for example, each with their own calibration frames.

2. Fixpix

Regions of bad lines and columns may be replaced by linear interpolation from neighboring lines and columns when the parameter fixpix is set. The bad regions are specified in a bad pixel file. The file consists of lines with four fields, the starting and ending columns and the starting and ending lines. Any number of regions may be specified. Currently, the coordinates given for the bad regions must be those that would be applicable if the CCD was used in SINGLE READOUT MODE, even if multi-readout images are being reduced. A task is being written to aid in the preparation of an appropriate bad-pixel file given measurements made on a raw multi-readout image.

Comment lines beginning with the character # may be included. If a comment line preceding the bad regions contains the word "untrimmed" then the coordinate system refers to the original format of the images; i.e. before trimming. If an image has been trimmed previously then the trim region specified in the image header is used to convert the coordinates in the bad pixel file to those of the trimmed image. If the file does not contain the word "untrimmed" then the coordinate system must match that of the image being corrected; i.e. untrimmed coordinates if the image has not been trimmed and trimmed coordinates if the image has been trimmed. Standard bad pixel files should always be specified in terms of the original format.

The bad pixel file may be specified explicitly with the parameter fixfile or indirectly if the parameter has the value "image". In the latter case the instrument file must contain the name of the file.

3. Overscan

The portion of the image used to determine the readout bias level is specified with the parameter biassec . This may be an explicit image section, or it may be set to the special value "image". In the latter case the value given in the image header is used. The image header value uses the entire overscan strip without allowing any margin between the data section and the bias section. Because Arcon uses a DC-coupled preamplifier the transition between data and overscan is very sharp indeed. Nonetheless, we recommend that you do skip the first few pixels of the overscan strip. To decide this issue for yourself, use implot to plot the average of several lines from a high exposure level image such as a flat field. Expand the transition region between data and overscan and decide how many pixels of the overscan are contaminated.

In the case of multi-readout images, the way in which an explicit value for biassec must be set, is unfortunately somewhat non-intuitive. Currently, the value recorded in the image header is that which would be appropriate had the detector been read out using a single amplifier; an explicit image section must be specified in the same way. Quadproc calculates the sections to use for the sub-images corresponding to each readout based on such "single readout" sections. To determine the section you must enter, use imhead or hselect to determine the value of biassec stored in the image header. If this is, for instance, "[1025:1060,1:1028]" then setting biassec = "[1029:1060,1:1028]" would leave a margin of 4 pixels (1029 - 1025). Note that if two readouts are used in the horizontal direction (quad or serial-split dual readout) the overscan strip for each amplifier is only half as wide as that in single readout mode. Thus in the example a 15 pixel (36 / 2 - 3) wide strip is used for each readout.

If an overscan or prescan correction is specified (overscan parameter) then the specified image section is averaged along the readout axis (readaxis parameter) to form a correction vector. A function is fit to this vector and for each readout line (image line or column) the function value for that line is subtracted from the image line. The fitting function is generally either a constant (polynomial of 1 term) or a high order function which fits the large scale shape of the overscan vector. Bad pixel rejection is also used to eliminate cosmic ray events. The function fitting may be done interactively using the standard icfit iteractive graphical curve fitting tool. Regardless of whether the fit is done interactively, the overscan vector and the fit may be recorded for later review in a metacode plot file named by the parameter quad.plotfile . The mean value of the bias function is also recorded in the image header and log file.

The overscan subtraction performed by quadproc corrects the amplifier-to-amplifier differences in the bias level, so that no readout structure should be visible in processed zero images. However, you will still see the chequer board structure in flatfield and object exposures (unless the sky level is zero) because of gain difference between the amplifiers.

4. Trim

When the parameter trim is set the input image will be trimmed to the image section given by the parameter trimsec . This may be an explicit image section, or it may be set to the special value "image". In the latter case the value given in the image header is used. The image header value keeps the entire imaging section of the CCD.

In the case of multi-readout images, the way in which an explicit value for trimsec must be set, is unfortunately somewhat non-intuitive. Currently, the value recorded in the image header is that which would be appropriate had the detector been read out using a single amplifier; an explicit image section must be specified in the same way. Quadproc calculates the sections to use for the sub-images corresponding to each readout based on such "single readout" sections. In addition one is currently restricted to trimming exactly the same number of columns from each side of the CCD; there is no such restriction on the number of lines which can be trimmed from the top and bottom edges of the image. To determine the section you must enter, use imhead or hselect to determine the value of trimsec stored in the image header. If this is, for instance, "[1:1024,1:1028]" then setting trimsec = "[10:1015,20:998]" would trim 9 columns from the left and right edges and 19 and 29 lines from the bottom and top edges respectively. If you need to perform an assymmetric trim in the horizontal direction this can be done, after processing, by using imcopy to copy the required portion of the image.

The trim section used for science images should, of course, be the same as that used for the calibration images.

5. Zerocor

After the readout bias is subtracted, as defined by the overscan or prescan region, there may still be a zero level bias. This level may be two dimensional or one dimensional (the same for every readout line). A zero level calibration is obtained by taking zero length exposures; generally many are taken and combined. To apply this zero level calibration the parameter zerocor is set. In addition if the zero level bias is only readout dependent then the parameter readcor is set to reduce two dimensional zero level images to one dimensional images. The zero level images may be specified by the parameter zero or given in the input image list (provided the CCD image type is defined).

When the zero level image is needed to correct an input image it is checked to see if it has been processed and, if not, it is processed automatically. Processing of zero level images consists of bad pixel replacement, overscan correction, trimming, and averaging to one dimension if the readout correction is specified.

6. Darkcor

Dark counts are subtracted by scaling a dark count calibration image to the same exposure time as the input image and subtracting. The exposure time used is the dark time which may be different than the actual integration or exposure time. A dark count calibration image is obtained by taking a very long exposure with the shutter closed; i.e. an exposure with no light reaching the detector. The dark count correction is selected with the parameter darkcor and the dark count calibration image is specified either with the parameter dark or as one of the input images. The dark count image is automatically processed as needed. Processing of dark count images consists of bad pixel replacement, overscan and zero level correction, and trimming.

7. Flatcor

The relative detector pixel response is calibrated by dividing by a scaled flat field calibration image. A flat field image is obtained by exposure to a spatially uniform source of light such as an lamp or twilight sky. Flat field images may be corrected for the spectral signature in spectroscopic images (see response and apnormalize ), or for illumination effects (see mkillumflat or mkskyflat ). For more on flat fields and illumination corrections see flatfields . The flat field response is dependent on the wavelength of light so if different filters or spectroscopic wavelength coverage are used a flat field calibration for each one is required. The different flat fields are automatically selected by a subset parameter (see subsets ).

Flat field calibration is selected with the parameter flatcor and the flat field images are specified with the parameter flat or as part of the input image list. The appropriate subset is automatically selected for each input image processed. The flat field image is automatically processed as needed. Processing consists of bad pixel replacement, overscan subtraction, zero level subtraction, dark count subtraction, and trimming. Also if a scan mode is used and the parameter scancor is specified then a scan mode correction is applied (see below). The processing also computes the mean of the flat field image which is used later to scale the flat field before division into the input image. For scan mode flat fields the ramp part is included in computing the mean which will affect the level of images processed with this flat field. Note that there is no check for division by zero in the interest of efficiency. If division by zero does occur a fatal error will occur. The flat field can be fixed by replacing small values using a task such as imreplace or during processing using the minreplace parameter. Note that the minreplace parameter only applies to flat fields processed by quadproc .

8. Illumcor

CCD images processed through the flat field calibration may not be completely flat (in the absence of objects). In particular, a blank sky image may still show gradients. This residual nonflatness is called the illumination pattern. It may be introduced even if the detector is uniformly illuminated by the sky because the flat field lamp illumination may be nonuniform. The illumination pattern is found from a blank sky, or even object image, by heavily smoothing and rejecting objects using sigma clipping. The illumination calibration image is divided into the data being processed to remove the illumination pattern. The illumination pattern is a function of the subset so there must be an illumination correction image for each subset to be processed. The tasks mkillumcor and mkskycor are used to create the illumination correction images. For more on illumination corrections see flatfields .

An alternative to treating the illumination correction as a separate operation is to combine the flat field and illumination correction into a corrected flat field image before processing the object images. This will save some processing time but does require creating the flat field first rather than correcting the images at the same time or later. There are two methods, removing the large scale shape of the flat field and combining a blank sky image illumination with the flat field. These methods are discussed further in the tasks which create them; mkillumcor and mkskycor .

9. Fringecor

There may be a fringe pattern in the images due to the night sky lines. To remove this fringe pattern a blank sky image is heavily smoothed to produce an illumination image which is then subtracted from the original sky image. The residual fringe pattern is scaled to the exposure time of the image to be fringe corrected and then subtracted. Because the intensity of the night sky lines varies with time an additional scaling factor may be given in the image header. The fringe pattern is a function of the subset so there must be a fringe correction image for each subset to be processed. The task mkfringecor is used to create the fringe correction images.

10. Readcor

If a zero level correction is desired (zerocor parameter) and the parameter readcor is yes then a single zero level correction vector is applied to each readout line or column. Use of a readout correction rather than a two dimensional zero level image depends on the nature of the detector or if the CCD is operated in longscan mode (see below). The readout correction is specified by a one dimensional image (zero parameter) and the readout axis (readaxis parameter). If the zero level image is two dimensional then it is automatically processed to a one dimensional image by averaging across the readout axis. Note that this modifies the zero level calibration image.

11. Scancor

CCD detectors may be operated in several modes in astronomical applications. The most common is as a direct imager where each pixel integrates one point in the sky or spectrum. However, the design of most CCD's allows the sky to be scanned across the CCD while shifting the accumulating signal at the same rate. Quadproc provides for two scanning modes called "shortscan" and "longscan". The type of scan mode is set with the parameter scanmode .

In "shortscan" mode the detector is scanned over a specified number of lines (not necessarily at sideral rates). The lines that scroll off the detector during the integration are thrown away. At the end of the integration the detector is read out in the same way as an unscanned observation. The advantage of this mode is that the small scale flat field response is averaged in one dimension over the number of lines scanned. A flat field may be observed in the same way in which case there is no difference in the processing from unscanned imaging and the parameter scancor should be no. However, one obtains an increase in the statistical accuracy of the flat fields if they are not scanned during the observation but digitally scanned during the processing. In shortscan mode with scancor set to yes, flat field images are digitally scanned, if needed, by the specified number of scan lines (nscan parameter).

In "longscan" mode the detector is continuously read out to produce an arbitrarily long strip. Provided data which has not passed over the entire detector is thrown away, the flat field corrections will be one dimensional. If scancor is specified and the scan mode is "longscan" then a one dimensional flat field correction will be applied. If the specified flat field (flat parameter) is a two dimensional image then when the flat field image is processed it will be averaged across the readout axis to form a one dimensional correction image.

12. Outline of Processing Steps

Because of the special handling required for multi-readout data quadproc internaly reduces the data in two stages.

Stage one
The opperations which may be performed in the first stage are badpixel correction, determination and subtraction of the readout bias level, and trimming. This stage is only performed if one or more of the fixpix , overscan or trim flags is set to yes.

First, all the calibration images which will be needed are identified. Any which were obtained in multi-readout mode AND which have not already been trimmed are selected for processing during this stage. This is neccesary to ensure that the calibration images will be reduced properly. Similarly, the input list is searched and all multi-readout images, which have not already been trimmed are selected for processing.

The images selected in this way are then processed sequentialy. Each is split into separate images one for each amplifier. The values of the trimsec and biassec header keywords for each of these sub-images are set as required. ccdproc is then run to correct bad pixels, determine and subtract the readout bias and trim each sub-image. Finaly, the pieces are glued back together again to form the complete image and the header information is tidied up. The resulting image is initialy created as a temporary image. When stage one processing is complete the original image is deleted (or renamed using the specified backup prefix) and the corrected image replaces the original image. Using a temporary image protects the data in the event of an abort or computer failure. Keeping the original image name eliminates much of the record keeping and the need to generate new image names.

Stage two
Ccdproc is now run a second time to process ALL input images. For those images which were NOT selected for processing during stage one all the selected processing steps are carried out during this second pass. For those which were selected in stage one only the remaining processing steps will be performed. Again the output processed image is initialy created as a temporary image. When stage two processing is complete the original image is deleted (or renamed using the specified backup prefix) and the corrected image replaces the original image.

The following difference in the behaviour of quadproc and ccdproc should be noted:

Because it is a script, and because it is reads and writes each image several times during processing quadproc is not very efficiant. This will be rectified when the present prototype code is replaced by the final version.
If backups are enable then quadproc will produce two intermediate images for every input image which is modified in both processing stages. These backup images may quickly fill up the available disk space.
Images may not be processed in the order they appear in the input list. Stage one processing is performed (if neccessary) on all calibration images, then on all images in the input list. Any images which have already been trimmed, or which were taken in mono-readout mode will be skipped. Stage two processing is then done sequentialy on all images in the input list.

13. Processing Arithmetic

The quadproc task has two data paths, one for real image pixel datatypes and one for short integer pixel datatype. In addition internal arithmetic is based on the rules of FORTRAN. For efficiency there is no checking for division by zero in the flat field calibration. The following rules describe the processing arithmetic and data paths.

(1)
If the input, output, or any calibration image is of type real the real data path is used. This means all image data is converted to real on input. If all the images are of type short all input data is kept as short integers. Thus, if all the images are of the same type there is no datatype conversion on input resulting in greater image I/O efficiency.
(2)
In the real data path the processing arithmetic is always real and, if the output image is of short pixel datatype, the result is truncated.
(3)
The overscan vector and the scale factors for dark count, flat field, illumination, and fringe calibrations are always of type real. Therefore, in the short data path any processing which includes these operations will be coerced to real arithmetic and the result truncated at the end of the computation.

14. In the Absence of Image Header Information

The tasks in the quad package are most convenient to use when the CCD image type, subset, and exposure time are contained in the image header. This is true for all data obtained with Arcon. The ability to redefine which header parameters contain this information makes it possible to use the package at many different observatories (see instruments ). However, in the absence of any image header information the tasks may still be used effectively. There are two ways to proceed. One way is to use ccdhedit to place the information in the image header.

The second way is to specify the processing operations more explicitly than is needed when the header information is present. The parameter ccdtype is set to "" or to "none". The calibration images are specified explicitly by task parameter since they cannot be recognized in the input list. Only one subset at a time may be processed.

If dark count and fringe corrections are to be applied the exposure times must be added to all the images. Alternatively, the dark count and fringe images may be scaled explicitly for each input image. This works because the exposure times default to 1 if they are not given in the image header.

EXAMPLES

The user's guide presents a tutorial in the use of this task.

1. In general all that needs to be done is to set the task parameters and enter

cl> quadproc *.imh &

This will run in the background and process all images which have not been processed previously.

SEE ALSO

quadformat, ccdproc, instruments, ccdtypes, flatfields, icfit, quad, guide, mkillumcor, mkskycor, mkfringecor


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